The Blacklist (NBC)

"But [Adam Godley's] not the only guest star to turn in a quality performance: Lilli Stein does a fantastic job as the young, awkward inventress who is all too eager to believe Gouldberry’s claims that he can get her plans for an alternative source of power for cars off the ground, getting us to care enough about her during the modest amount of time she appears on-screen to worry when the show leaves her fate unknown."

- Reggie Peralta, NOTEY: TV Review: THE BLACKLIST: Season 4, Episode 5: The Lindquist Concern [NBC]

SCHOOLED by Lisa Lewis at the New york fringe Festival and Encore series

"Stein's claire is relatable and vulnerable. She brings the audience on her emotional journey and when she says to Stephen with the utmost sincerity, “Screenplays saved my life,” there is no doubt that it is true.” -Theatre is Easy

"Lilli Stein, a great mix of naive and canny" - ONE Magazine​

"It is the sizzle between Stein and Maré that is especially captivating to watch."

- NY Theater Now

PRESS

"The actors are polished and appealing and the banter is clever."

- David Cote, Time Out New York

"Lilli Stein does fine work as Claire, nicely capturing her vulnerabilities, strengths, and anger."

- Show Showdown

Appropriate by Branden Jacobs-Jenkins at the Humana Festival at the Actors Theatre of Louisville

"Lilli Stein is remarkably credible as Bo’s prepubescent daughter Cassidy. Although Ms. Stein is a college graduate, she completely convinced me she was (at least) a good ten years younger." - StageLeft

"As their daughter, Cassidy, Lilli Stein is another standout performer as a present-day teenager. These kids grew up with high-speed Internet, and most of them have smartphones by middle school and can’t imagine being unable to access information instantly, and they’re probably way better at it than we are. Cassidy is curious, fast-paced and ahead of the game, but she will never find a solution to teen angst and hormones on the Internet, which Stein captures profoundly." -Leo Weekly

"Consider Lilli Stein in the role of the 13-year old Cassidy in Branden Jacobs-Jenkins’ Appropriate. She uses space and gesture in ways that let you see through her character’s psychology. She’s got the thought she is thinking, the lie she is telling and the typical 13-year old pivot to an ambivalent changed-mind; it’s all happening simultaneously.

 

Plopped on the couch, she is asked if she likes her slightly older cousin, Rhys (David Rosenblatt). The questioner means “likes” as in sexual attraction. “Ewwwwwwwwwwwwww!” I don’t even know if she says it, but Stein snaps shut in a fetal curl no crow bar could pry apart. Her eyes, peeking out, announce the possibility that maybe, maybe, okay well she does like cousin Rhys and maybe, maybe she has a sympathetic listener. Her forehead strikes an angle and you swear to god you can see traces of confused teenage sexual energy radiate off it like a human satellite dish.

 

Good actors can make you see things that aren’t there. So when Franz (Reese Madigan) rushes in dripping wet from his madcap jump into the pond, probably taking grandpa’s controversial photo album with him, I looked to Cassidy for clues. There she is by grandpa’s armchair with her back sheepishly turned, guarding her secret from the group. What she knows instantly – quicker than anyone else in the room because she is smarter than anyone else in the room – is that those photos are done. Gone. Over. Fish food.

 

Both actors, Madigan and Stein, are equally matched.  Both know that where they stand in relation to other characters takes yet another measurement of their characters. The empty space between them is a shape, and that shape has almost a physical dynamic. Such actors thrill the eye with messages that are often beyond the reach of the text they are performing.

- Truth in Movement

 

© 2016.  Lilli Stein.